Legendary Cincinnati radio host Jim Scott dies after battle with ALS


Longtime Cincinnati host Jim Scott died Friday evening, according to his wife, Donna. He was 81. Scott was a radio host for 47 years, finally retiring in 2015. He was perhaps best known for his role at 700WLW, where he spent 31 years of his career. Scott was battling ALS, which he revealed in a very personal post last year. “Last night, our beloved Jim passed away and is now in the loving, welcoming embrace of his mom and dad, my sister and many friends,” Donna Scott said on Facebook. “He has a new birthday. The grace with which he faced and endured the indignities of ALS was amazing and inspiring. Just like Jim. With his modesty, thoughtfulness and gratitude, he continued to bring joy to everyone he met.” WLWT's Sherry Paolello interviewed Scott last year, after he went public with his ALS diagnosis. “In October of last year, I literally woke up and my whole left side was hanging down.” he told WLWT. Scott also said he couldn't believe the incredible irony of the circumstances under which he was diagnosed. He was diagnosed on April 1, 2021, shortly after he returned from attending the Reds Opening Day Parade. “You're kidding. April 1, Opening Day, and you're telling me I have a disease named after a ball player?” he told his doctor. ALS is also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the former Yankees player of the same name. The Reds recently celebrated MLB's 4th Annual Lou Gehrig Day at Great American Ballpark earlier this month. Scott also said his ALS diagnosis has deeply upset his family. “It must have been harder for Donna than it was for me. You know, she's here today. She brought me here. She's loving and strong. She really helps me through everything.” However, Scott's family and friends have also not hesitated to speak out on his behalf in recent months as his ALS has progressed. “My dad has had a wonderful love relationship with the public, and people have had that same relationship with him,” Scott's son Casey Boland told WLWT's Courtice Fuller in March. “ALS has been very difficult in the physical aspect, he loved to go to the Salvation Army and ring the bells or go to Kroger in person, and it has taken all of that away from him, and it's been very difficult physically,” Boland said. “But then the other part, I think that has let him down the most is the voice part.” However, Boland said ALS still hasn't stopped his father from trying his best to put a smile on people's faces. “He still spreads joy when he meets people and even when he rarely talks, he always finds a way to spread happiness,” Boland said. Scott was born in 1942 and raised in upstate New York. He graduated from Harper College (now Binghamton University) before beginning his career with brief stints at several different radio stations across the country. It was Cincinnati, however, where Scott found a permanent home. Additionally, Scott became a very devoted lifelong fan of the Cincinnati Reds. Earlier this year this commitment culminated in Scott being asked to serve as the honorary grand marshal for the Reds Opening Day Parade. Donna Scott said a celebration of life in honor of her husband will be held soon. There is no information yet on whether it will be open to the public. The full post announcing Scott's death can be read below.

Longtime Cincinnati host Jim Scott died Friday evening, according to his wife, Donna.

He was 81 years old.

Scott was a radio host for 47 years, eventually retiring in 2015. However, he was perhaps best known for his role at 700WLW, where he spent 31 years of his career.

Scott had been battling ALS, which he revealed in a personal post last year.

“Last night, our beloved Jim said goodbye to this world and now he is in the loving and welcoming embrace of his mom and dad, my mom, his sister and many friends,” Donna Scott wrote on Facebook. “He has a new birthday. The grace with which he faced and endured the indignities of ALS was amazing and inspiring. The same is true for Jim. With his modesty, thoughtfulness and gratitude, he sparked joy in everyone he met.”

WLWT’s Sherry Paolello interviewed Scott last year when he went public with his ALS diagnosis.

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“In October of last year, I woke up and my whole left side was hanging off,” he told WLWT.

Scott also said he couldn’t believe the incredible irony of the circumstances under which he was diagnosed. He was diagnosed on April 1, 2021, shortly after returning from attending the Reds Opening Day Parade.

He recalled telling his doctor, “You've got to be kidding. It's April 1st, Inauguration Day, and you're telling me I have a disease named after a ball player?”

ALS is also called Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the former Yankees player of the same name. The Reds recently celebrated MLB's fourth annual Lou Gehrig Day at Great American Ballpark earlier this month.

Scott also said the ALS diagnosis has been difficult for his family.

“Donna must have had it harder than I did. You know, she's here today. She brought me here. She's loving and strong. She really helps me with everything.”

However, Scott's family and friends have also not hesitated to speak out on his behalf in recent months as his ALS disease continues to progress.

“My dad has had a wonderful love relationship with the public, and the public has had a similar relationship with my dad,” Scott's son, Casey Boland, told WLWT's Courtice Fuller in March.

“ALS has been very tough in terms of the physical aspect, he used to love to go to the Salvation Army and ring the bells or go to Kroger and perform at Kroger, but it has taken all of that away from him, and it's been very tough physically,” Boland said. “But then the other part, I think what has frustrated him the most is the voice component.”

However, Boland said ALS still hasn’t stopped her father from his efforts to bring smiles to people’s faces.

“He still spreads joy to people, even when he meets people and has little interactions, he finds some way to spread joy,” Boland said.

Scott was born in 1942 and grew up in upstate New York. He graduated from Harper College (now Binghamton University) before beginning his career with brief stints at several different radio stations across the country. It was Cincinnati, however, where Scott found a permanent home.

In addition, Scott became a lifelong devoted fan of the Cincinnati Reds. This commitment culminated earlier this year when Scott was asked to serve as the Honorary Grand Marshal for the Reds Opening Day Parade.

Donna Scott said a celebration of life will be held soon in her husband's honor. There is no information yet on whether it will be open to the public.

The full post announcing Scott's death can be read below.

This content is imported from Facebook. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their web site.




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